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Cardiac and Vascular Consultants

Cardiac and Vascular Consultants

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Cardiac and Vascular Consultants (CVC) is the premier cardiac and vascular practice serving communit

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Great outcomes for our patients!
A new patient was scheduled for an evaluation by Dr. Yelamanchi. Unfortunately, prior to the appointment the patient was emergently admitted to a hospital in Ocala with a gangrenous great toe wound. He was admitted on a Wednesday and was not going to be able to have an angiogram of his lower extremities to assess the blood flow until the following Monday due to staffing issues in the hospital. Dr. Yelamanchi requested that the patient sign out of the hospital and come straight to our cathlab. Our cathlab was able to perform the angiogram that day and intervened on right popliteal, tibial peroneal trunk, posterior/anterior tibial arteries with laser atherectomy and angioplasty with great results.
#cvc
#PeripheralArteryDisease
#PAD
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7 days ago
Great outcomes for our patients!
A new patient was scheduled for an evaluation by Dr. Yelamanchi.  Unfortunately, prior to the appointment the patient was emergently admitted to a hospital in Ocala with a gangrenous great toe wound. He was admitted on a Wednesday and was not going to be able to have an angiogram of his lower extremities to assess the blood flow until the following Monday due to staffing issues in the hospital. Dr. Yelamanchi requested that the patient sign out of the hospital and come straight to our cathlab.  Our cathlab was able to perform the angiogram that day and intervened on right popliteal, tibial peroneal trunk, posterior/anterior tibial arteries with laser atherectomy and angioplasty with great results. 
#cvc
#PeripheralArteryDisease
#PADImage attachment

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Amazing team of doctor

Beautiful work Dr. Yelamanchi

What awesome patients we have! They are very appreciative of the hard work of Dr. Upadya and staff at Lake Cardiovascular Diagnostic Center.
Thank You, Mrs. Mary Ryan, for the edible arrangement.
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2 weeks ago
What awesome patients we have! They are very appreciative of the hard work of Dr. Upadya and staff at Lake Cardiovascular Diagnostic Center.
Thank You, Mrs. Mary Ryan, for the edible arrangement.

Comment on Facebook

Congratulations

Congratulations

What can I do to help my Peripheral Arterial Diseases?
Here are a few things things that you can do to help.
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco smoke is a major risk factor for PAD and increases your risk for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke, take steps to quit. Effective tools include behavior modification programs, nicotine replacement medicines and other quit-smoking medications. Quitting smoking will help slow the progression of PAD and other heart-related diseases.
Physical Activity
An effective treatment for PAD symptoms is regular physical activity. Your doctor may recommend supervised exercise training, also known as supervised exercise therapy (SET). You may have to begin slowly, but simple walking regimens, leg exercises and treadmill exercise programs can ease symptoms.
Exercise for intermittent claudication considers that walking causes pain. The program consists of alternating activity and rest in intervals to build up the amount of time you can walk before the pain sets in. It’s best if this exercise program is done in a rehabilitation center on a treadmill and monitored. If it isn’t possible to go to a rehabilitation center, your health care professional may recommend a structured community or home-based program.
Diet
Many people with PAD have elevated cholesterol levels. A diet low in saturated and trans fat can help lower blood cholesterol levels. Cholesterol-lowering medication may also be needed.
Aim for a healthy diet that emphasizes vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Include low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, nuts, seeds and non-tropical vegetable oils such as olive oil. Limit sodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages and red meat.
Managing Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of poor outcomes among people with PAD. Achieving glucose control benefits all people with diabetes and can reduce limb-related complications in people with PAD.
Work with your health care team to create a coordinated care plan including:
Healthy diet to reduce your cholesterol and manage diabetes
Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight
Medications for glucose management
Managing other cardiovascular risk factors
Foot care and ulcer prevention

Call today for an appointment. (352)633-1966
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago
What can I do to help my Peripheral Arterial Diseases?
Here are a few things things that you can do to help.
Smoking Cessation
Tobacco smoke is a major risk factor for PAD and increases your risk for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke, take steps to quit. Effective tools include behavior modification programs, nicotine replacement medicines and other quit-smoking medications. Quitting smoking will help slow the progression of PAD and other heart-related diseases.
Physical Activity
An effective treatment for PAD symptoms is regular physical activity. Your doctor may recommend supervised exercise training, also known as supervised exercise therapy (SET). You may have to begin slowly, but simple walking regimens, leg exercises and treadmill exercise programs can ease symptoms. 
Exercise for intermittent claudication considers that walking causes pain. The program consists of alternating activity and rest in intervals to build up the amount of time you can walk before the pain sets in. It’s best if this exercise program is done in a rehabilitation center on a treadmill and monitored. If it isn’t possible to go to a rehabilitation center, your health care professional may recommend a structured community or home-based program.
Diet
Many people with PAD have elevated cholesterol levels. A diet low in saturated and trans fat can help lower blood cholesterol levels. Cholesterol-lowering medication may also be needed.
Aim for a healthy diet that emphasizes vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Include low-fat dairy products, poultry, fish, legumes, nuts, seeds and non-tropical vegetable oils such as olive oil. Limit sodium, saturated and trans fats, added sugars, sugar-sweetened beverages and red meat. 
Managing Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes increases the risk of poor outcomes among people with PAD. Achieving glucose control benefits all people with diabetes and can reduce limb-related complications in people with PAD. 
Work with your health care team to create a coordinated care plan including:
Healthy diet to reduce your cholesterol and manage diabetes
Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight
Medications for glucose management
Managing other cardiovascular risk factors
Foot care and ulcer prevention

Call today for an appointment.  (352)633-1966

Greta case with Dr. Aloul! Patient presented with buttock pain when walking a few blocks. Patient was found to have left internal iliac artery chronic total occlusion. Dr. Aloul inserted two stents into the internal and external iliac arteries and obtained great results. ... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago
Greta case with Dr. Aloul! Patient presented with buttock pain when walking a few blocks. Patient was found to have left internal iliac artery chronic total occlusion. Dr. Aloul inserted two stents into the internal and external iliac arteries and obtained great results.

In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the gradual narrowing of the vessel lumen after coronary stent implantation due to the increase in vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor protein plays an important role in this process.
Here are two examples of in-stent restenosis from last week.
These are normally treated with atherectomy and angioplasty.
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago
In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the gradual narrowing of the vessel lumen after coronary stent implantation due to the increase in vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor protein plays an important role in this process.
Here are two examples of in-stent restenosis from last week.
These are normally treated with atherectomy and angioplasty.Image attachment

Another great case with Dr. Upadya.
Pt was referred to us with a non-healing wound on his recently amputated great toe.
Pt had also undergone a partially successful revascularization attempt by another local cardiologist.
Dr. Upadya was able to restore flow to the lower leg via pedal approach.
Dr. Upayda accessed the posterior and anterior tibial arteries from the foot and performed angioplasty of these vessels, we also performed atherectomy and angioplasty of the SFA.
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2 months ago

Comment on Facebook

Fantastic!!!!

Dr. Upadya is one of the best. I worked with him for several years.

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A Thank you letter for Dr. Upadya

A Thank you letter for Dr. Upadya

A Thank you letter for Dr. Upadya

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A Thank you letter for Dr. Upadya

A Thank you letter for Dr. Upadya

A Thank you letter for Dr. Upadya

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